ARCHIVE SEARCH
      -OR-  
 
  NEWS CHANNELS
 > Fitness News
Asthma Allergy News
Diabetes News
Women's Health News
Men's Health News

  MY NEWS
Personal Archive
My Account

  ABOUT THIS NEWSFEED
About Us
Advertise With Us
Feed Your Site
Contact Us


Site Map
RSS News Feed 

  Website development & hosting
   by Cyber Software Solutions

 
12 Ounces of Sugary Soda a Day Raises Diabetes Risk: Study
European researchers found odds rose by up to 22 percent at this level of consumption

THURSDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking just one 12-ounce sugar-sweetened soft drink a day can increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 22 percent, a European study contends.

The finding is based on an analysis of data collected from more than 28,000 people in Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

The increased risk of developing diabetes associated with having one sugar-sweetened soft drink a day fell to 18 percent when the investigators took into account people's total calorie intake and body-mass index (BMI), a measurement of body fat based on height and weight.

Both total calorie intake and BMI are believed to play a role in the link between sugar-sweetened soft drinks and diabetes risk. The fact that diabetes risk fell only slightly when these two factors were taken into account could indicate that the effect of sugar-sweetened soft drinks on diabetes goes beyond their impact on body weight, said Dora Romaguera, of the Imperial College London, and colleagues.

The findings are published in the April 24 issue of the journal Diabetologia.

The study found an association between consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks and heightened risk of type 2 diabetes. It did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

Consumption of pure or diluted fruit juice was not significantly associated with diabetes risk, according to the report.

The 22 percent increased risk of diabetes among Europeans who drink sugar-sweetened soft drinks is similar to previous research showing that North Americans who consume these types of beverages have a 25 percent increased risk of diabetes, the researchers said in a journal news release.

"Given the increase in sweet beverage consumption in Europe, clear messages on the unhealthy effect of these drinks should be given to the population," Romaguera said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about diabetes.



SOURCE: Diabetologia, news release, April 24, 2013

-- Robert Preidt

Health News Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Back to Top Stories
  GOOGLE ADS